Tuesday, May 22, 2018

World Series: Did You Know?

Well, I was wrong about something earlier. Now, it's time to set the record straight.

I mentioned earlier some time back, that George Gibson was the first Canadian to appear in the Fall Classic. That is, in fact, not true. There was a switch-hitter from New Brunswick who appeared three years earlier in the World Series (1906). It should be noted, however, that Gibson was the first Canadian-born player to appear in every game in the Fall Classic. Not a cameo as you will see with Bill O'Neill.

O'Neill was on the 1906 Chicago White Sox. Known as the "Hitless Wonders," the team hit just .230 in the regular season. John hit only .248 in 1906. But still, that was better than some of his teammates.

But after playing 94 regular season games, Billy did a lot of watching in the World Series as his Chicago White Sox faced their pals across town: The Chicago Cubs!

So poor hitting wasn't about to stop 'em! The AL winners scored just 2 runs in a 2-1 win in game one, but got beaten badly, 7-1 in game three. However...In the Cubbies home park, West Side Grounds, it was the National League team that starved for hits, and our boy's cameo.

Ed Walsh, the Pale Hose starter, went the distance. Hits allowed? 2 K's? 12. For good measure, Ed even scored a run. Outside of the first inning, the Cubs were held hitless! It should be noted, the White Sox managed only 4 hits themselves off Jack Pfiester. And the game itself was scoreless through five.

And that's when the wheels came off the Cubs' chariot.

Lee Tannehill got it all started by singling to lead off. Ed Walsh, the pitcher having a great game, walked. Right fielder Ed Hahn was hit by a pitch, loading 'em up! Bill O'Neill came in to run for the right fielder.

Jack Pfiester retired the next 2 batters. But then he gave up a bases-clearing triple to George Rohe. That, of course, was the game's only scoring play.

O'Neill stayed in the game, in right. Pfiester got him to pop to third in the top of the 8th. As it turns out, neither team scored again. Bill only got to make one putout in the remaining 4 innings.

The White Sox went on to win the 1906 World Series in 6 games, as the all-Chicago Fall Classic went to the AL side of things.


References


Sports Reference LLC. Baseball-Reference.com - Major League Statistics and Information. http://www.baseball-reference.com/. Web. 22 May. 2018.

Nowlin, Bill. “John O'Neill.” Society for American Baseball Research, Society for American Baseball Research, <sabr.org/bioproj/person/b6cd442a>. 22 May. 2018.

Monday, May 14, 2018

World Series: Did You Know?

Casey Stengel and Aaron Ward both hit .417, or 41666... in the 1923 Fall Classic. Tough time to determine who hit for the highest average in that World Series. Gotta go with both, I guess. Stengel was 5-12 and Ward 10-24.

Oh, the teams? Both from New York. It was, for the third year in a row, Giants vs. Yankees.

Stengel started the World Series off in dramatic fashion. His inside-the-park home run in the top of the ninth won game one at Yankee Stadium. The home team had led 3-0 early, but couldn't hold it. For his part, Ward was 2-4 at the dish. Hitting .500. But his team needed more offence.

Actually, same deal in game 2. Ward, 2-4. Yankees? 4 runs. However, the opposition only scored 2 runs, and this thing was level at 1 game each. It was Ward with a home run of his own to help the cause. The teams had alternated wins, as they had ballparks. Game 2 was played at the Polo Grounds. Unlike today where it's 2-3-2. Surprisingly, Casey Stengel, 2-3 in game 1, only saw time as a defensive replacement in centre field this game. So times at the dish for him.

In game 3 back at Yankee Stadium, Stengel and Ward were a combined 2-7. However, only one run scored this game. Guess how it was scored? Stengel, another home run.

Back at the Polo Grounds, the visitors won for the fourth time in this Fall Classic. The Yankees scored 6 runs in the top of the 2nd to put this one away, although the final score was sure a slug fest, 8-4. Aaron Ward was 2-4 for the 3rd time in the 1923 World Series, but was upstaged by Casey Stengel. Casey was a perfect 2-2, and even walked twice. For some bizzare reason, manager John McGraw pinch hit for Casey in the bottom of the ninth. That inning saw the Giants (Albeit too late) get another inside-the-park home run from Ross Young. Bill Cunningham, batting for Stengel one out later, fanned.

The first all-out rout in '23 was the pivotal game 5. The Yankees, led by Ward's fourth 2-4 game, won easily 8-1. Oddly enough, Babe Ruth didn't have an RBI. But he touched home twice (Ward didn't once despite his efforts). The home team had finally won. Stengel didn't get a hit, but collected the lone Giants' RBI.

Despite trailing 3-2, the Giants went home and appeared to have this Fall Classic sent back to the Stadium for game 7. Despite a home run by Ruth, it was 4-1 Giants after 7. In the top of the 8th, as Stengel watched helplessly from the dugout, the Yankees scored 5 runs on only 3 hits. That concluded the game's scoring.

Stengel came on to pinch hit in the bottom of the frame, but could only pop to third. Ward had just a hit to show for 4 trips to the plate. So the two didn't do much in the clincher. No matter, they'd topped everyone else in batting average over the course of the six-game World Series.


References


Enders, Eric. 100 years of the World Series. New York: Sterling Publishing Co., Inc. 2005. Print.

Neft, David S., Richard M. Cohen, and Michael L. Neft. The Sports Encyclopedia: Baseball, 1992. 12th ed. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1992. Print.

Neft, David S., and Richard M. Cohen. The World Series: Complete Play-by-play of Every Game, 1903-1989. 4th ed. New York: St. Martin's, 1990. Print.

Nemec, David et all. 20th Century Baseball Chronicle: A Year-by-year History of Major League Baseball. Collector's Edition. Lincolnwood, Ill: Publications International, 1993. Print.


Snyder, John S. World Series!: Great Moments and Dubious Achievements. San Francisco: Chronicle, 1995. Print.

Sports Reference LLC.  Baseball-Reference.com - Major League Statistics and Informationhttp://www.baseball-reference.com/. Web. 14 May. 2018.

Sunday, May 13, 2018

Common Denominator: St. Louis And Las Vegas

"Expansion teams, won 8 postseason games their first year in the National Hockey League."

The great expansion of 1967/68 saw the NHL double in size from six teams to twelve. One of the new teams was the St. Louis Blues, who were coached by some chap named Scotty Bowman. They had Glenn Hall in net, plucked away from Chicago in the expansion draft.

The team itself was full of many of these castoffs, but Hall certainly was a steal. Amazingly enough, the Blues would be the third team he took all the way to the Stanley Cup finals. How long did it take Glenn to do that? Only 13 seasons. In 1961, he beat Montreal single-handily in the semi-finals and then nailed the door shut on Detroit (His old team) a round later. Just the type of goalie a new team needs.

Now, the Blues W-L-T record wasn't very good, 27-31-16. Put in perspective five of the Original Six teams (Boston, Chicago, Montreal, New York  and Toronto did better than that. Two other new teams topped it for good measure. But neither the Philadelphia Flyers or Los Angeles Kings would make the Stanley Cup finals that year.

Philadelphia, with their 31-32-11 record for...first place in the Western Conference (Home of all the newbies) got St. Louis in the first round of the playoffs. It was now three rounds to win for the Stanley Cup. Previously, it had been only two.

Red Berenson had led the Blues in scoring with just 51 points. Their team captain, btw, was none other than future legendary coach Al Arbour. Amazingly enough, he'd been to the Stanley Cup finals with three teams himself. And St. Louis would be the fourth.

It took seven games, but St. Louis had an upset. They stole it 3-1 in game 7 on the road. Minnesota was next, but this time, guess who had home ice advantage? St. Louis did. They needed it, too, as Ron Schock's double-OT winner in game seven sent the Blues into the finals against the Montreal Canadians.

Now, here's where it's not fair. An established team vs. a new team. A current greats vs. a bunch of "has beens"? St. Louis wasn't exactly the latter, but they were swept!

But then again, every game was close. One goal decided every game, in fact. Games one and three went into OT. Glenn Hall? He walked away with the playoff MVP (Conn Smythe Award). The team had nothing to be ashamed of.



50 years later, the Las Vegas Golden Knights were the one and only newbies in the NHL, which was now at 31 teams, if you can believe it. You know what team was the worst? Why the Golden Knights. Only, they didn't exactly play like that in 2017/18, did they?

They didn't.

How long did it take them to win their 27th game? Only 38 contests were needed for Las Vegas to get that. At the time, the Golden Knights were 27-9-2. Wow!

Soon, the expansion team won their 34th game of the season, a new National Hockey League record for first-year organizations. Vegas didn't stop there. When the smoke had cleared after 82 regular season games, the new kids were 51-24-7. 1st place in the Pacific. Third overall in the Western Conference. Hmmm...Where have I heard that one before?

When the playoffs started, Vegas rode a strong team effort to sweep the Los Angeles Kings in round #1. But here we go again. All four games were decided by one goal.



The San Jose Sharks was once an expansion team not that long ago. 1991/92 to be exact. Hey, Gary Bettman wasn't even around back then and the NHL was 75 years old. Not 101.

Getting back to it, no sweep here. The Sharks, coming off a sweep of their own of the Anaheim Ducks, stayed with the Knights. After losing the first game by a lopsided score of 7-0, they bounced back with some overtime magic to steal game two. The new guys were undaunted. They won an OT game of their own in the third contest, but couldn't get anything past Martin Jones in the fourth one. The 4-0 win by San Jose at home leveled this, 2-2 in games.

Here's where Las Vegas was expected to fold. But they held on to their nerves. A 4-0 lead was nearly erased, and the home team needed a Jonathan Marchessault empty net goal to prevail 5-3. The series then shifted back to San Jose and Marc Andre Fleury was through giving up goals to the Sharks. His team scored three, but Marc needed only one. The 3-0 win moved 'em into the Conference Finals. Winnipeg was up next!



So, do the wheels finally come off the chariot here? Just like it did in the third round for St. Louis 50 years ago? Could very well have. Game one went to the home team, the Jets.


If the new guys want to make it a series, Las Vegas will have to steal game two on the road. Coach Gerald Gallant will have to be a mastermind ala-Scotty Bowman. Nonetheless, years after the first expansion experiment produced the lovable Blues, the Knights are trying to write their own history. For now, they'll have to settle with a shared spot in NHL history for postseason wins by a first year expansion team.


References


Diamond, Dan. Total Stanley Cup: An Official Publication Of The National Hockey League. Toronto: Published in Canada by Total Sports Canada, 2000. Print.

McFarlane, Brian. Brian McFarlane's History Of Hockey. Sports Publishing Inc., 1997. Print.

Irvin, Dick. The Habs: An Oral History Of The Montreal Canadiens, 1940-1980. McClelland & Stewart, 1992. Print.

Maguire, Liam. What's The Score? Random House Canada, 2001. Print

“Official Site Of The National Hockey League.” NHL.com. The National Hockey League. Web. 13 May. 2018. <www.nhl.com/>.

Sports Reference LLC.  Hockey-Reference.com - Hockey Statistics and History. http://www.hockey-reference.com/. Web. 13 May. 2018.

Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation. Web. 13 May. 2018. <https://en.wikipedia.org>.

Sunday, May 6, 2018

Smyly's Only Relief So Far Was In 2013, Part 2

Drew Smyly's second set of stats is no less awesome than his first set. The 21 (Cook got that number the previous year) holds more than makes up for the "only" 2 saves he recorded in 2013. His WHIP and WAR is right up there. Drew also fanned 9.6 batters per 9 innings pitched.


Stat Set 2



Pitcher Year S BS S% H ERA K K/9 WHIP WAR
                     
Walsh 1904 1 ? ? ? 2.60 57 4.6 1.102 0.1
                     
Griffith 1905 1 ? ? ? 1.68 46 4.1 0.954 3.3
                     
Keefe 1907 3 ? ? ? 2.50 20 3.1 1.387 2.0
        &nbnbsp;            
Chappelle 1908 0 ? ? ? 1.79 23 2.9 1.095 0.3
                     
Leever 1909 2 ? ? ? 2.83 23 3.0 1.257 -0.1
                     
Pitcher Year S BS S% H ERA K K/9 WHIP WAR
                     
Phillipe 1910 4 ? ? ? 2.29 30 2.2 0.986 2.0
                     
Baskette 1912 1 ? ? ? 3.18 51 4.0 1.336 2.2
                     
Crandall 1913 6 ? ? ? 2.86 42 3.9 1.290 0.5
                     
Wolfgang 1914 0 ? ? ? 1.89 50 3.8 1.073 1.8
                     
Mays 1915 7 ? ? ? 2.60 65 4.4 1.063 1.0
                     
Danforth 1917 9 ? ? ? 2.65 79 4.1 1.324 3.2
                     
Dubuc 1919 3 ? ? ? 2.66 32 2.2 1.182 0.6
                     
Pitcher Year S BS S% H ERA K K/9 WHIP WAR
                     
Morton 1921 1 ? ? ? 2.76 45 3.8 1.207 2.3
                     
Baumgartner 1925 3 ? ? ? 3.57 18 1.4 1.368 2.5
                     
Marberry 1926 22 ? ? ? 3.00 43 2.8 1.348 3.1
                     
Haid 1928 5 ? ? ? 2.30 21 4.0 1.064 0.4
                     
Rommel 1929 4 1 0.800 1 2.85 25 2.0 1.484 1.6
                     
Pitcher Year S BS S% H ERA K K/9 WHIP WAR
                     
Lindsey 1931 7 1 0.875 ? 2.77 32 3.9 1.634 1.1
                     
Quinn 1932 13 ? ? ? 2.66 24 3.5 1.383 1.1
                     
Russell 1933 13 ? ? ? 2.69 28 2.0 1.218 3.1
                     
Brown 1938 5 ? ? ? 3.80 55 3.7 1.500 0.4
                     
Pitcher Year S BS S% H ERA K K/9 WHIP WAR
                     
Beggs 1940 7 4 0.636 0 2.00 25 2.9 1.161 2.2
                     
Murphy 1941 15 7 0.682 0 1.98 29 3.4 1.397 2.2
                     
Adams 1943 9 2 0.818 0 2.82 46 3.0 1.254 3.0
                     
Heving 1944 10 ? ? 0 1.96 46 3.5 1.228 1.9
                     
Maltzberger 1944 12 ? ? 0 2.96 49 4.8 1.095 1.8
                     
Christopher 1947 12 2 0.857 0 2.90 33 3.7 1.277 1.4
                     
Page 1949 27 11 0.711 0 2.59 99 6.6 1.315 4.2
                     
Pitcher Year S BS S% H ERA K K/9 WHIP WAR
                     
Konstanty 1950 22 4 0.846 0 2.66 56 3.3 1.039 4.7
                     
Aloma 1951 3 1 0.750 0 1.82 25 3.2 1.096 3.2
                     
Wilhelm 1952 11 1 0.917 1 2.43 108 6.1 1.155 2.7
                     
Paige 1952 10 5 0.667 1 3.07 91 5.9 1.254 3.4
                     
Kinder 1953 27 8 0.771 4 1.85 39 3.3 1.140 4.5
                     
Mossi 1954 7 0 1.000 0 1.94 55 5.3 1.022 3.3
                     
Narleski 1955 19 2 0.905 6 3.71 94 7.6 1.281 2.5
                     
Freeman 1956 18 3 0.857 2 3.40 50 4.1 1.344 2.6
                     
Farrell 1957 10 3 0.769 0 2.38 54 5.8 1.320 2.4
                     
Zuverink 1957 9 8 0.529 0 2.48 36 2.9 1.278 2.7
                     
Hyde 1958 18 5 0.783 0 1.75 49 4.3 1.136 4.9
                     
Duren 1959 14 7 0.667 1 1.88 96 11.3 1.200 3.8
                     
Staley 1959 15 4 0.789 2 2.24 54 4.2 1.169 2.5
                     
Face 1959 10 9 0.526 1 2.70 69 6.7 1.243 3.2
                     
Pitcher Year S BS S% H ERA K K/9 WHIP WAR
                     
McDaniel 1960 26 6 0.813 1 1.29 95 8.2 0.863 6.0
                     
Brosnan 1960 12 2 0.857 2 2.36 62 5.6 1.020 2.7
                     
Arroyo 1961 29 10 0.744 1 2.19 87 6.6 1.109 3.3
                     
Fox 1961 12 2 0.857 3 1.41 32 5.0 1.012 2.6
                     
Radatz 1963 25 3 0.893 0 1.97 162 11.0 1.096 5.7
                     
Perranoski 1963 21 8 0.724 0 1.67 75 5.2 1.202 4.5
                     
Lee 1964 19 8 0.704 1 1.51 111 7.3 1.058 4.3
                     
Ellis 1964 14 2 0.875 1 2.57 125 9.2 1.054 3.1
                     
Miller 1965 24 1 0.960 1 1.89 104 7.8 0.997 4.3
                     
Regan 1966 21 7 0.750 1 1.62 88 6.8 0.934 5.0
                     
Hoerner 1966 13 3 0.813 4 1.54 63 7.5 1.026 3.0
                     
Drabowsky 1967 12 5 0.706 3 1.60 96 9.1 0.955 3.2
                     
Abernathy 1967 28 6 0.824 1 1.27 88 7.4 0.978 6.2
                     
Wood 1968 16 5 0.762 7 1.87 74 4.2 1.006 5.4
                     
Tatum 1969 22 1 0.957 2 1.36 65 6.8 1.042 4.3
                     
Pitcher Year S BS S% H ERA K K/9 WHIP WAR
                     
Williams 1970 15 4 0.789 7 1.99 76 6.0 1.032 2.8
                     
McMahon 1970 19 5 0.792 0 2.96 74 7.1 1.219 3.0
                     
Sanders 1971 31 4 0.886 0 1.91 80 5.3 1.064 4.1
                     
Giusti 1972 22 5 0.815 0 1.93 54 6.5 1.058 2.3
                     
Knowles 1972 11 3 0.786 5 1.37 36 4.9 1.310 2.5
                     
Hiller 1973 38 4 0.905 0 1.44 124 8.9 1.021 8.1
                     
Borbon 1973 14 5 0.737 6 2.16 60 4.5 1.421 2.5
                     
Marshall 1974 21 12 0.636 9 2.42 143 6.2 1.186 3.1
                     
Gossage 1975 26 5 0.839 1 1.84 130 8.3 1.193 8.2
                     
Eastwick 1976 26 9 0.743 1 2.09 70 5.9 1.115 2.8
                     
Lyle 1977 26 8 0.765 1 2.17 68 4.5 1.197 3.7
                     
Sutter 1977 31 9 0.775 0 1.34 129 10.8 0.857 6.5
                     
Stanley 1978 10 5 0.667 1 2.60 38 2.2 1.242 4.1
                     
Blair 1978 28 5 0.848 2 1.97 91 8.2 1.246 4.1
                     
Tekulve 1979 31 6 0.838 8 2.79 75 5.0 1.176 3.2
                     
Pitcher Year S BS S% H ERA K K/9 WHIP WAR
                     
McGraw 1980 20 5 0.800 0 1.46 75 7.3 0.921 4.7
                     
Fingers 1981 28 6 0.824 0 1.04 61 7.0 0.872 4.2
                     
Caudill 1982 26 6 0.813 0 2.35 111 10.4 1.045 4.4
                     
Reardon 1982 26 8 0.765 2 2.06 86 7.1 1.128 3.5
                     
Smith 1983 29 4 0.879 1 1.65 91 7.9 1.074 4.8
                     
Hernandez 1984 32 1 0.970 0 1.92 112 7.2 0.941 4.8
                     
Lamp 1985 2 5 0.286 8 3.32 68 5.8 1.164 1.3
                     
Eichhorn 1986 10 4 0.714 7 1.72 166 9.5 0.955 7.4
                     
Righetti 1986 46 10 0.821 0 2.45 83 7.0 1.153 3.8
                     
Henke 1987 34 8 0.810 1 2.49 128 12.3 0.926 3.3
                     
Burke 1987 18 4 0.818 5 1.19 58 5.7 0.890 4.3
                     
Henneman 1988 22 7 0.759 2 1.87 58 5.7 1.051 3.3
                     
Lancaster 1989 8 3 0.727 7 1.36 56 6.9 1.032 3.9
                     
Russell 1989 38 6 0.864 0 1.98 77 9.5 0.950 2.5
                     
Pitcher Year S BS S% H ERA K K/9 WHIP WAR
                     
Eckersley 1990 48 2 0.960 0 0.61 73 9.0 0.614 3.3
                     
Thigpen 1990 57 8 0.877 0 1.83 70 7.1 1.038 3.4
                     
Henry 1991 15 1 0.938 3 1.00 28 7.0 0.833 2.2
                     
Aguilera 1991 42 9 0.824 0 2.35 61 8.0 1.072 2.4
                     
Ward 1992 12 4 0.750 24 1.95 103 9.1 1.135 3.1
                     
Rojas 1992 10 1 0.909 13 1.43 70 6.3 1.043 3.9
                     
Wetteland 1993 43 1 0.977 0 1.37 113 12.0 1.008 4.2
                     
Harvey 1993 45 4 0.918 0 1.70 73 9.5 0.841 4.0
                     
Beck 1993 48 4 0.923 0 2.16 86 9.8 0.882 2.4
                     
Hoffman 1998 53 1 0.981 0 1.48 86 10.6 0.849 4.1
                     
Urbina 1998 34 4 0.895 0 1.30 94 12.2 1.010 3.2
                     
Williamson 1999 19 7 0.731 5 2.41 107 10.3 1.039 2.8
                     
Pitcher Year S BS S% H ERA K K/9 WHIP WAR
                     
Rhodes 2001 3 4 0.429 31 1.72 83 11.0 0.853 2.5
                     
Smoltz 2003 45 4 0.918 0 1.12 73 10.2 0.870 3.3
                     
Timlin 2005 13 7 0.650 24 2.24 59 6.6 1.320 2.9
                     
Nathan 2006 36 2 0.947 0 1.58 95 12.5 0.790 3.3
                     
Ryan 2006 38 4 0.905 1 1.37 86 10.7 0.857 3.6
                     
Putz 2007 40 2 0.952 0 1.38 82 10.3 0.698 4.0
                     
Rivera 2008 39 1 0.975 0 1.40 77 9.8 0.665 4.3
                     
Pitcher Year S BS S% H ERA K K/9 WHIP WAR
                     
Bell 2010 47 3 0.940 0 1.93 86 11 1.200 1.9
                     
Aceves 2011 2 3 0.400 11 2.61 80 6.3 1.105 2.7
                     
Cook 2012 14 7 0.667 21 2.09 80 9.8 0.941 2.6
                     
Chapman 2012 38 5 0.884 6 1.51 122 15.3 0.809 3.6
                     
Johnson 2012 51 3 0.944 0 2.49 41 5.4 1.019 2.4
                     
Smyly 2013 2 4 0.333 21 2.37 81 9.6 1.039 2.6
                     
Davis 2014 3 3 0.500 33 1.00 109 13.6 0.847 3.7
                     
Rondon 2015 30 4 0.882 8 1.67 69 8.6 1.000 2.2
                     
Britton 2016 47 0 1.000 0 0.54 75 9.9 0.836 4.2
                     
Osuna 2016 36 6 0.857 0 2.68 82 10.0 0.932 2.1
                     
Brach 2016 2 5 0.286 24 2.05 92 10.5 1.038 2.5
                     
Miller 2016 12 2 0.857 25 1.45 123 14.9 0.686 3.8
                     
Robertson 2017 14 2 0.875 8 1.84 98 12.9 0.849 2.9
                     
Jansen 2017 41 1 0.976 1 1.32 109 14.4 0.746 2.9
                     
Albers 2017 2 4 0.333 14 1.62 63 9.3 0.852 2.5
                     
Pitcher Year S BS S% H ERA K K/9 WHIP WAR


Notes

Baumgartner appeared as a starter twelve times

Wolfgang and Baskette appeared as a starter eleven times.

Danforth appeared as a starter nine times.

Phillipe and Walsh appeared as a starter eight times.

Morton and Griffith appeared as a starter seven times.

Paige, Mays, Chappelle and Rommell appeared as a starter six times.

Marberry, Mossi, Lee, Ellis and Dubuc appeared as a starter five times.

Leever and Aceves appeared as a starter four times.

Russell, Stanley, Adams and Keefe appeared as a starter three times.

Brown, McDaniel, Wood, Crandall, Brosnan and Lindsey appeared as a starter two times.

Beggs, Quinn, Narleski, McGraw and Aloma appeared once as a starter.

Maltzberger, Hyde, Konstanty, Duren, Brosnan, Tekulve and Henke all wore glasses.


References


Sports Reference LLC. " Pitching Stats". Baseball-Reference.com - Major League Statistics and Information. <https://www.baseball-reference.com/players/s/smylydr01-pitch.shtml>. Web. 06 May. 2018.